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Texas Land For Sale

   Valle De Oro Texas Land


Valle De Oro Land For Sale

Land for Sale Near Amarillo, Texas




Jump to the Land Properties for Sale Section or read further for descriptions of the Valle De Oro region.



Valle De Oro Texas Map

Valle De Oro is Spanish for "valley of gold". Originally named for the golden yellow blooms of wildflowers that still blanket the region during rainy seasons. Some land owners have also enjoyed panning for gold along the river bed as well as on inland properties (although no one is known to have struck it rich yet). The land is teeming with deer, fox, turkey, road runners, owls, pheasant, hawks, cotton tail rabbits, quail, numerous types of song birds, coyotes, beaver, bobcats, and an occasional eagle or two.

Valle De Oro is centrally located in the Texas panhandle, about 25 miles northwest of Amarillo, and about 10 miles southeast of Boys Ranch.








2017 Updates


2017 Land Values: I first learned of Valle De Oro land around 1970 when it was selling for $200.00-$250.00 per acre, which until recently had been a relatively stable price for unimproved rural land in Texas. Around the early 1980s there was a land-rush as speculators believed that the Valle De Oro land would become popular, and a lot of people paid up to around $2,000.00 or more an acre for 5 to 10 acre tracts. Within a few years the speculators discovered that the land was still only worth about $200.00 an acre, and the land-rush quickly died. To my knowledge, there are still many individuals who own over-priced Valle De Oro land, but they cannot resell the land for what they paid, so they are stuck paying annual taxes on land that they cannot use.

I have owned four different Valle De Oro properties that ranged from 5 acres to over 40 acres each, and the typical costs were around $150.00 to $200.00 per acre, with one 5+ acre property selling for under $50.00 an acre in 1995 (the previous owner did not want it, and since he could not sell it, he gave it to a charity that also did not want it, and since I was the only person to make an offer, then I got the riverfront property for $250.00 total). To my knowledge there are still hundreds of acres for sale for around $200.00 or less an acre if a person knows who to ask.

The Valle De Oro region will likely never have high land values because of several disadvantages:

[1] Water: the typical well is at a depth that has a shallow water table, which commonly causes the wells to run dry if a resident attempts to use water like they did in the city (e.g. water their lawns), especially if the property has a nearby neighbor who also wastes water. Deeper wells ought to be much better, but the cost can be very expensive. Some of the properties closer to the river have salty water, which makes the wells pretty much useless for anything at all. (The salt is partly caused by the dam having been built in New Mexico, which now prevents sizable river flow: in some areas of Valle De Oro, the land is sometimes white with a salt crust.)

[2] Sewage Treatment: depending on the area, some septic systems require the use of transpiration systems due to the sandy soil, which are very expensive and tend to not work well. Individuals who are accustomed to flushing anything and everything in the city, may find it difficult to adjust to septic systems.

[3] City Electricity: unless the land already has power lines, expect the cost to install new poles to be around $20,000.00 to $50,000.00 or more. One property that I purchased had power lines running to the land, but between the time of my signing the papers and calling the power company, Xcel had sent out linemen to remove all power lines in the area. I was told by Xcel that they would happily run the power back to my house if I paid over $10,000.00 (1989 rates). Most people have to have city electricity, and since city electricity is not economically feasible for most of the region, then the land values remain low.

FYI, solar and wind power are options, but unless an individual is a knowledgeable electronic tech and is skilled with alternative energy, then solar and wind power will very likely not be suitable for most residents. For myself, I prefer to live an almost no-tech 19th century lifestyle, so for me the absence of city electricity is a plus.

[4] Insects: the region has a severe infestation of flesh-eating insects that make life intolerable for many land owners. Blue flies, gnats, wasps, and ants are bad, but the 9 to 12+ inch long Chinese centipedes are poisonous and very aggressive. I was bit on my leg by a centipede in 1995 that caused extreme pain for a day, swelling of the leg, and the flesh turned black and died about an inch around the bite. The muscle tissue literally felt like it was boiling in acid. If I had not been experienced with emergency treatment, or if I had been bit on the neck or closer to the heart, I might not have survived. Not many people can endure such a hostile environment, which keeps land values low.

[5] Animals: mice and rats are common, which poses the danger of hantavirus (which is not uncommon in the region). Since the region has been destroyed by people cutting down trees, then there are few birds, which leaves little natural insect control. Deer and rabbits are hungry and will eat vegetable gardens, tree saplings, or most anything else a land owner tries to grow. City dwellers frequently abandon their dogs in the country, which then become dog packs, some of which are aggressive. Rattle snakes... lots of them, everywhere. Living in the region requires a constant battle to defend from hungry animals.

[6] Hunters: many city dwellers believe that they have the right to hunt and trespass anywhere outside of the city limits. Hunters in the Valle De Oro area have always been a severe problem, and are one of the reasons why many Valle De Oro residents never walk out of their homes without carrying a gun. I have lived in the Texas panhandle almost all of my life, and never have I seen any place as violent as Valle De Oro. If an individual does not want to always carry a gun for self-defense, then Valle De Oro is not where they want to live.

[7] Brush Fires: in past years it was common to have a nearby brush fire two or three times a year, but by the late 90s the frequency had increased to two to four a week. The personal danger from brush fires is not high, but the almost-constant aroma of burned weeds ruins the air quality.

[8] Stock Yard: the stench from a south stock yard settles in the valley, and the stench can be horrific at times. The first time I smelled it, I thought a cow had backed-up to my window and spewed on the house; it was that strong. Unless a person has a personal enjoyment of smelling some rather rancid cow poop, the valley is not a good place for breathing.

[9] Dumping: there is no nice way of saying it... Valle De Oro is trashy and it gets trashier every year. People dump their trash on other people's properties rather than haul their trash to the city landfill, and some areas of the valley have become toxic dump sites. Aside from the eyesores and stenches, the trash also provides shelter for rodents and rattle snakes.

Use Google Earth® to view nearby properties before buying. Most valley residents are good people, but the trashy neighbors are not good people, and they are prone to steal from their neighbors' properties.

Not funny is that my property was frequently invaded by city people who thought that it was okay for them to trespass on my land because my land was kept tidy and mowed. As one fellow said, he thought my property was a park because it was so clean. To me, it seems like the harder I try to create a nice home, the more I get invaded.

[10] Dirt Roads: except for a few properties with paved roads near the highway, all of the other roads are dirt, with many of the roads being impassable in wet seasons without a four wheel drive vehicle. Most of the properties on paved roads are very close to the highway and/or train tracks, so the noise level is much too high.

[11] New Residents: another new group of speculators are hoping for another land-rush, and they are building expensive homes on land that cannot support the homes' needs for water and sewage treatment. The homes are quickly going back up for sale at prices that no one would pay unless they recently moved to the Texas panhandle from a different state and know nothing about rural land. Of the newer homes that I have seen for sale, the prices are higher than most new city homes, and the houses are located near dump sites and dilapidated properties. Old mobile homes that would have sold for around $10,000.00 to $15,000.00 ten years ago are now up for sale at near $70,000.00. The sharp increase of prices do not reflect the properties' real value.

As a general idea, newcomers to the region usually move back to the city within a year. The more common reasons that I was told for the newcomers leaving were that country life was too expensive, too hard, and too uncomfortable. It is relatively rare to find someone who has lived in the valley more than two years. The frequent selling of land results in prices dropping.

[12] True Value of Land: Valle De Oro land that is on a paved road near the highway and has a well, septic, and city electricity might be worth around $10,000.00 to $15,000.00 for the first five acres, and about $200.00 an acre thereafter. Unimproved land should still be around $200.00 depending on the location and view. Land bordering the river used to be desirable for its view and privacy, but the hunters, insects, and expensive utilities now make riverfront properties not much desirable.

[13] Microwave Tower: towards the south edge of the valley is a large telephone company microwave tower that appears to be a repeater between Dalhart and Amarillo. The direction of broadcast appears to run directly through some of the northern areas of Valle De Oro. It is popularly known that city neighborhoods within similar paths have a higher frequency of residents being ill and having shorter lifespans. Satellite dishes are not usable in the regions due to the high interference of microwave radiation. Except for some of the few low-lying areas of Valle De Oro that are partially shielded by cliffs, microwave radiation in the valley is high and unhealthy, especially for individuals who are sensitive to electromagnetic radiation. Health-conscious individuals should avoid most areas of the valley.

Beware of individuals who are attempting to sell Valle De Oro land for high prices. If you want to own land in the valley, then shop around and ask questions first; you should be able to find nice little properties at reasonable prices.



Restrictions: Generally there are no building restrictions other than county codes for wells and septic systems. Owners are free to own and keep horses, build a house of the styling they prefer, or just leave the land untouched.

Access to Canadian River: There are no public roads nor access to the river except at the main highway near Boys Ranch. Owners of land bordering the river, of course, have ready access. It is considered to be terribly impolite to cross a neighbor's property without first getting permission, but permission is almost always given to those who ask first. Recent changes in riparian land rights provide land owners with the age-long custom of gaining land when the river shifts to a flow away from their land, but that also means the land owner may lose some land if the river changes its course and flows further inland. No known land not currently bordering the river is in any threat of erosion due to river course changes.

Property Values: As with all other real estate, Valle de Oro land values rise and decline according to the economy. A well-groomed property might bring as much as double average prices, and of course the riverfront properties will usually fetch a small premium over inland properties. Each property is unique and must be evaluated individually. Current regional land values about fifteen miles south of Amarillo are advertised at roughly $7,000.00 per acre, and properties nearest the city are commonly sold for approximately $10,000.00 per acre. However, as mentioned above, Valle De Oro land has several disadvantages that will likely always keep the value down. Expensive land with all utilities near the city is cheaper and better in all ways than Valle De Oro land with similar utilities.

Land Type: Originally the valley was inhabited by Comanche, later owned by cattlemen, and then sold to a company that dug-up a sizable portion of the area to remove gravel needed for the booming city of Amarillo. Some properties were never touched and are of perfectly natural terrain, but other properties still have small mounds and dug-outs where the gravel company had turned soil. Both types of properties are well-suited for any desired use, but the properties with mounds will need to be bull-dozed if the owner prefers flat land. Some buyers enjoy the roughest possible terrains to hike on, and too, deer and other animals prefer hollow areas to hide and sleep in. People who enjoy exercise and animals prefer the hilly terrain, and people who just want to run horses or build a house prefer the flatter lands. There is something for just about everyone in Valle De Oro.

People: Most all known permanent residents are good folks who freely express the Texas hospitality that the panhandle was once so well-known for.






Valley de Oro Real Estate



Valle De Oro Road

Roads in the Valle De Oro region are a mixture of paved areas and inner roads of dirt and/or gravel. No two properties are alike in appearance nor accessibility. Telephone lines run to all properties, but city power lines may or may not be close to a property. Typical water well depths run approximately 135 to 180 feet deep depending on the land's elevation, but low-lying properties bordering the river can access useful irrigation water at as little as five feet deep (if the water is not too salty).



Valley De Oro Road

Rainfall in the valley can range from around 15 inches to over 50 inches per year, but expect a typical average of 25 inches or so. Due to the dams in New Mexico releasing a predetermined quantity of water downstream, water flow on Canadian River is mild, rarely becoming a threat of flooding except during the worst of storms. Due to the steady incline of the land, water runs off quickly and rarely presents any danger to the low-lying properties.





Properties For Sale







10.477 deeded acres

SOLD



Valle de Oro land for sale

Valle De Oro land for sale

Valle De Oro land for sale

Road view from the east border.



Property#: u11t12

Contact:

Acres (+-): 10.477

SOLD

Taxes (+-): $117.15

Power line: no

Borders river: no

Fencing: no (neighbor's partial fencing on east border: all borders are marked)

Well: none (possible live spring)

Septic: no

Other improvements: borders marked; ready for fencing; telephone and city electricity are available


Description:

Rare for the Texas panhandle is a live spring, and the cliffs on this property are the only known land in the Valle de Oro area to have a spring. As of February 2006, a spring is keeping the surrounding soil several feet into the adjoining property soaking wet even though rainfall for the Texas panhandle has been far below normal for several months. A simple process of hammering a pipe into a cliff should produce a similar or better spring on this property. During normal rainfall periods, a spring is expected to be a useful and clean supply of water for watering trees or other needs. Water is the single most important thing needed on all properties, and this property can have it flowing freely from the cliffs.

The property is about 1320 feet deep (about a quarter of a mile), and is located approximately 1.5 miles east from the highway on Davison Road. About 100 yards further to the east is Gold Road that heads south. About .25 miles further to the east is the railroad crossing. Davison Road is paved for about a quarter mile from the highway, with county-graded dirt and rock the rest of the way. The road is passable year-round.

The land's southern boundary runs near the lower edges of the smaller caprocks. The land is generally just slightly rolling with a few flat areas. All vegetation appears to be native to the region (no salt cedar seen), and a large quantity of plum thickets line the cliff sides (mighty good eating!). The land slopes towards the road, so there is good drainage and no concern of flooding. The soil is mostly fine sand with thin layers of clay that washes down from the caprock; excellent for gardening. Earthen dams could be constructed to hold rainwater year-round for all irrigation needs. The land is clean, of natural terrain, and appears to have not been abused at all. Viewing the land from the road, it is plenty attractive, and the caprock appears much smaller in the photo taken from the road.

Several splits exist in the sand stone cliffs, creating excellent sitting areas that are cool in summer and warm in winter. Some of the cliffs have markings left by visitors in the 19th century and perhaps earlier (interesting to history buffs). A clearing on top of the north caprock collects water during rains, but with drainage would make a beautiful spot to build a small weekend cabin. Nowhere else in the panhandle is there known to be buyable land of similar beauty.

The best water table is probably around 120 to 200 feet deep, and likely of good quality. The presence of bulrush plants shows that shallow water tables exist no deeper than 20 feet. The actual shallow water table is guessed to be approximately 10 feet deep, perhaps less, and the shallow water tables are excellent for trees (no watering needed once trees are established). Nearby properties are not being lived on. Installing a septic system shouldn't present a problem. The nearest electrical lines are about a mile to the west on Davison Road, and about half a mile to the east across the railroad tracks.

Alternative energy potential is high for this property. The border extends approximately 40 foot beyond the top of the cliffs along the north area where winds are the highest and well-suited for wind generators. The Texas panhandle is also well-known for plentiful sunlight to power photovoltaic panels (solar panels). The current owner used alternative energy for 100% of all energy needs for over five years on a different property, and the owner has said this property is among the most ideal for anyone wanting 'off the grid'.

This property is amongst the most desirable rural land anywhere in the Amarillo area. The owner needs to sell quickly.








SOLD

House on 36.5 acres (+-)

Bristow, Oklahoma



Bristow land for sale


Property#: britok

Acres (+-): 36.5

Price: sold

Taxes (+-): unknown

Power line: yes

Borders river: no

Fencing: yes

Well: yes, deep well

Septic: yes

Other improvements: Storage buildings, large pond, numerous fruit trees.

Description:

The land is the site where the old school house sat 70 years ago. Sitting up on top of the hill, the views are pleasant, much of the land is covered in trees, and a sizable pond sits off to one side that holds water year-round.

The 1568 square foot manufactured house is a 1999 Clayton, with 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, fireplace, and front porch. The house is all-electric and has central air conditioning.

The property is currently being lived on and is ready to be moved into.

Located within about a mile of the small Bristow airport and commercial districts, land values are expected to rise sharply with the new aircraft businesses entering the town. The property is ideal for several uses including country living, retirement, and investing.






Valle De Oro Texas land for sale


Property#: 0015

Contact (phone number or email): sold

Acres (+-): 6

Price: sold

Taxes (+-):

Power line: no

Borders river: yes

Fencing: yes

Well: shallow 5'

Septic: yes

Other improvements: none






Valle De Oro land for sale

Property#: 0018

Contact (phone number or email): sold

Acres (+-): 16

Price: sold

Taxes (+-):

Power line: no

Borders river: no

Fencing: yes

Well: no

Septic: no

Other improvements: none








Valle De Oro land for sale

Property#: 0019

Contact (phone number or email): sold

Acres (+-): 16

Price:

Taxes (+-):

Power line: no

Borders river: no

Fencing: yes

Well: no

Septic: no

Other improvements: none








Valle De Oro land for sale

Property#: 0031

Contact (phone number or email): sold

Acres (+-): 6

Price: sold

Taxes (+-):

Power line: no

Borders river: yes

Fencing: yes

Well: shallow 5'

Septic: no

Other improvements: Land has been cleared of brush and numerous trees have been planted.








Valle De Oro land for sale

Property#: 0030

Contact (phone number or email): sold

Acres (+-): 6

Price: sold

Taxes (+-):

Power line: no

Borders river: yes

Fencing: yes

Well: shallow 5'

Septic: yes

Other improvements: 16'x20' wooden cabin, photovoltaic panels, wind generators, PVC greenhouse, fully self-sufficient, land is cleared, mowed, and has numerous trees planted.








Valle De Oro land for sale

Property#: 0064

Contact (phone number or email): sold

Acres (+-): 15

Price: sold

Taxes (+-):

Power line: yes

Borders river: yes

Fencing: yes

Well: shallow 5'

Septic: yes

Other improvements: none








Property#: 0010

Contact (phone number or email): sold

Acres (+-): 10

Price: sold

Taxes (+-):

Power line: no

Borders river: no

Fencing: no

Well: no

Septic: no

Other improvements: none








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